Romano dal Forno image

PRODUCER

ROMANO DAL FORNO

Romano Dal Forno took control of his Valpolicella estate at the age of 22 and quickly turned for advice to the Veneto’s maestro, Giuseppe Quintarelli. A policy of low yields and an uncompromising drive for quality and selectivity, as well as the use of unusual grapes to back up the Corvina, has established the Dal Forno family as the producers of among the finest wines produced from dried grapes - an otherworldly Amarone, a complex Valpolicella Superiore and a delicious sweet Passito, all brought to the UK exclusively by Armit Wines…

SWITCH TO

PRICE TYPE

DISPLAYING 1 - 5 of 5

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR YOU

Image of wine Vigna Seré
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2003 Vigna Seré, Romano dal Forno

Bottle 37.5cl £124.30

Image of wine Prosecco Frizzante
BUY
TASTING NOTES

Being Frizzante in style, this Prosecco has a lighter, finer mousse which makes it the perfect wine for an aperitive. In the glass you'll find delicious aromas of white stone fruit and golden apple with lively acidity to refresh your palate. A perfect glass of fizz to enjoy on its own or alongside some some canapés. Think fresh figs and...

more
BUY

Prosecco Frizzante, Biancavigna

Bottle 75cl £10.95

Image of wine Riva Bianco
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2014 Riva Bianco, Botter

Bottle 75cl £8.00

Image of wine Riva Rosso
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2014 Riva Rosso, Botter

Bottle 75cl £8.00

Image of wine Prosecco Spumante Brut
BUY
TASTING NOTES

Biancavigna lead the way for high quality Prosecco making ones with elegance, grace and beautiful minerality. On the nose, ripe stone fruit abound with nuances of peach and blossom. Creamy in texture with a fine mousse and refreshing acidity. Beautifully refreshing as an aperitive or enjoy with the local cheese belonging to the Prosecco region - Taleggio. A soft, creamy...

more
BUY
Image of wine Prosecco di Conegliano Valdobbiadene DOCG Brut
BUY
TASTING NOTES

A very typical and elegant aroma with distinctive fruity notes that remind of apple and white fruit. On the palate it is creamy, with a vivacious and fruity aftertaste. Delicate mineral taste on the finish and good persistency.

more
BUY
Image of wine Rose del Drago
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2016 Rose del Drago, Musella

Bottle 75cl £13.85

Image of wine Valpolicella Superiore
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY
Image of wine Amarone
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2012 Amarone, Musella

Bottle 75cl £36.15

2011 Valpolicella Superiore

Romano dal Forno

In Stock

Case 6 x 75cl
Available In Bond

Image of wine Valpolicella Superiore
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2003 Vigna Seré

Romano dal Forno

In Stock

Bottle 37.5cl £124.30

Image of wine Vigna Seré
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2003 Vigna Seré, Romano dal Forno

Bottle 37.5cl £124.30

2004 Vigna Sere

Romano dal Forno

In Stock

Case 6 x 37.5cl
Available In Bond

Image of wine Vigna Sere
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2011 Amarone Della Valpolicella

Romano dal Forno

In Stock

Case 6 x 75cl
Available In Bond

Image of wine Amarone Della Valpolicella
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY

2010 Amarone Della Valpolicella

Romano dal Forno

In Stock

Case 6 x 75cl
Available In Bond

Image of wine Amarone Della Valpolicella
BUY
TASTING NOTES

more
BUY
SWITCH TO

PRICE TYPE

DISPLAYING 1 - 5 of 5

One of Romano Dal Forno’s earliest memories is of helping his father in the vineyards at the age of five, trying to control an unruly mule much larger than himself. More than five decades on, it seems he’s barely had a day off from working with these vines, planted in the foothills of the Monti Lessini, east of Lake Garda and just north of Verona, in the Valpolicella DOC. He is, however, supported by several members of his family - notably his sons Michele, Marco and Luca and his wife Loretta.

Between them, they tend 25 hectares of extremely low yield grapes and a winery, completed in 2011, in which one might assume magic happens, but - again - actually fastidious attention to detail and painstaking hard graft leads to absolutely incredible Amarone della Valpolicella and Valpolicella Superiore.

Romano Dal Forno’s location in Val d’Illasi - the flatter land in the Po Valley which was once seen as being an add-on when the Valpolicella- DOC was demarcated - has, at times, been associated with high yields and questionable quality. Not so with Dal Forno’s methods. In 1980, soon after he took control of the estate at the age of 22, Romano went to visit the maestro of Amarone, Giuseppe Quintarelli. Over the years, Quintarelli became his tutor of philosophy - guiding him in the ways of quality over quantity.

As well as dramatically reducing yields, Dal Forno eliminated the pale, tart, and oxidation-prone Molinara grape and revived the likes of Oseleta (similar to the king of Valpolicella, the Corvina) and Croatina (deep in colour and fruit). Dal Forno has proven over years that this alluvial plain, composed of 70% gravel, 15% silt and 15% clay, can be magnificent terroir for these wines.

In essence, the same process is used to produce both Valpolicella Superiore and Amarone. Selective harvesting takes place over a month, with only the best bunches picked as soon as they are optimal ripeness. In fact, it takes six vines to produce a bottle of Romano Dal Forno Valpolicella Superiore and an astonishing nine to create the Amarone. Then each bunch is manually sorted to remove less than perfect grapes. For both wines, there is a period of drying in the winery’s drying rooms, which have an innovative ventilation system which maintains an elevated and thorough air flow.

After a further manual selection to remove any grapes damaged in the drying process, 15 days of fermentation takes place in steel tanks at a controlled temperature of around 28°, with automated punch-downs. They are then decanted into new-oak barriques for 36 months of maturation before bottling and further ageing for a further two years before release.

Of course, there are differences - and not only in the ratio of grape varieties used (Valpolicella Superiore: 70% Corvina and Corvina grossa, 20% Rondinella, 5% Croatina, 5% Oseleta; Amarone: 60% Corvina, 20% Rondinella, 10% Oseleta, 10% Croatina). For Amarone, fruit is only taken from vines over 10 years old. And the drying period is three months - twice as long as for Valpolicella Superiore. In addition, because of residual sugars, 18 months of the ageing is actually a period of further fermentation for the Amarone. 

The Valpolicella Superiore is an intensely aromatic, dark red wine, reminiscent of a very dry mulled wine - fresh, jammy, acidic and spiced in just the right harmony. Hints of blueberry, blackberry, cherry and chocolate emerge gradually and envelop the palate, held together by potent tannins which give it such great ability to age.

The Amarone della Valpolicella is somehow even more powerful, yet a step up in elegance too. Even more inky than its brother, it is full of mature dark fruits, black cherry, truffle and dark chocolate, with gentleman’s club notes of pipe tobacco and leather armchairs. Indeed, while the Valpolicella Superiore will well accompany a hearty meal, for the Amarone you probably need to be sitting down in a quiet room, in a favourite chair, to enjoy what the Dal Forno family call a meditative wine which leads to an almost other-worldly sensory experience.

Dal Forno also produces a third wine, a sweet Passito Vigna Seré - otherwise known as Recioto, the wine which predated Amarone (which translates as “big bitter” to differentiate it from the sweeter style of hay-dried wines) as the wine of this part of Veneto. As with the other two wines, Armit Wines has been exclusively importing this to the UK for over a decade. Its dense opulence is rich in ripe plums and roasted sugary notes. It serves as a wonderful return from the Interstellar trip of Amarone, to more sociable drinking, carrying you through the cheese course into coffee and chocolates.

Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7908 0655 web@armitwines.co.uk

drinkaware.co.uk